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Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon that is processed for industrial use. At this point, the rolling of this metal, whether cold or hot, is one of the systems that is most used for its subsequent use. Depending on the temperature at which the steel is subjected, we will speak of cold or hot rolling. What is the difference?

The importance of knowing the differences between both processes

The main difference between hot and cold lamination is the production process. While hot rolling is done with heat, cold, at room temperature. And, yes, it seems obvious, but it is important to know which one to use to avoid extra costs derived from additional processing. In short, knowing in detail the differences between the two processes is an integral part of the project.

Hot rolled

Hot rolling allows for greater malleability, resulting in a rough surface with rounded edges. The steel is subjected to a temperature close to 1000º C. In this way, the ductility of the metal at high temperatures is used to carry out large section reductions.

Applications

The hot rolling technique is used primarily in the manufacture of railway tracks, tires, water heaters, construction, etc. Let us bear in mind that in this process large parts are handled without having to worry about the integrity of the material, which is why, ultimately, it is appropriate in structural projects.

Cold Rolled 

Cold rolling, on the other hand, results in smooth, sharp-edged surfaces and is oily to the touch. It is a continuous process of deformation that is supported by high speeds, but keeping the temperature below the crystallization point.

Applications

Cold rolling is useful in the manufacture of tools, appliances, exhaust pipes, office supplies…

At Rodator we have extensive experience in the metal industry and we work on all hot and cold rolling processes, providing solutions with optimized performance and advanced quality. Call us!